A Calorimety lab can be summarized as follows: 2HCl(aq) + K2CO3(s) --> 2KCl(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g) We are told that 30mL/30g of HCL will b used, along with 2.60g of potassium carbonate - of...

A Calorimety lab can be summarized as follows:

2HCl(aq) + K2CO3(s) --> 2KCl(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

We are told that 30mL/30g of HCL will b used, along with 2.60g of potassium carbonate - of course, given this information we can calculate the heat energy given out or taken in during the experiment via the q=mcdeltaT formula. However, what if we were asked to calculate the heat change if one mole of potassium carbonate was used - how would we do this?

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jerichorayel | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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2HCl(aq) + K2CO3(s) --> 2KCl(s) + H2O(l) + CO2(g)

if you are asked to get the heat changed using one mole of potassium carbonate, yo just need to convert moles of potassium carbonate into mass. 

`1 mol e K2CO3 * (138.205g)/(mol e) =138.205 grams K2CO3`

The problem is not complete in this case, we need at least another variable in order to solve the problem. To get the change in the temperature of the system, the energy associated to the reaction should be given.

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foxwit | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Salutatorian

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I know that the starting temperature will be 21 degrees Celsius. Since we are dealing with constant pressure, could we substitute the DeltaH into the reaction for heat/q?

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