Describe the colonial discourse in "The Guest" by Albert Camus.

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Daru is disillusioned with the expediency and dogmatism of the colonial government as well as with the reactions of the Algerians. 

Having lived with the people of the region and taught them, Daru has gained some understanding of them. Along with this understanding, he has also acquired a certain distaste for colonial rule and its oppressive policies that impose a different way of life upon a people in their own country. Then, one day the Corsican gendarme Balducci, who brings with him a prisoner, arrives at the schoolhouse. Balducci imposes upon Daru, ordering the schoolmaster to deliver this prisoner to the police headquarters at Tinguit. Daru objects because he does not wish to become involved with such a matter. In fact, he questions the legitimacy of someone such as him having been chosen to deliver a prisoner.

"What's this story?" asked the schoolmaster.
"No, son. Those are the orders."
"The orders? I'm not..." Daru hesitated, not wanting to hurt the old Corsican. "I mean, that's...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 702 words.)

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