Closing statement for the following case needed. My problem here is that I cannot use any information or facts from outside : Patel v. The queen Shaili Patel, a crusading young lawyer and citizen of canada, is prevented by customs officials from returning home to Canada from her studies in the United States. The Government of Canada claims that Ms. Patel is in league with Known terrorists and posses a threat to Canadian national security if she is allowed to return to Canada. Ms. Patel maintains she is simply a Young Democrat and an opponent of the Bush Administration who has takes part in anti-Bush demonstrations in Washington and Ottawa. The Government appeals to the Anti-terrorism Act to justify its actions.   So here my problem is that this is the only information I have, which I can use. So, to work with such a limited amount of information is hard. I cannot get any arguements to prepare a closing statement. Please help.   P.S. : This is the only information given to me. ( CASE )   Thanks

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I think there are a couple of approaches you could take to this case. The first would be to emphasize that she is a Canadian citizen and that preventing her from returning to Canada is not actually possible under the framework of international law. She also has a right to be tried in Canada if she is actually accused of a crime. If she committed a crime in the United States, there would still be a problem with extradition, because Canada cannot extradite criminals to countries that have the death penalty except under very specific circumstances. Thus you need to ignore the extraneous information and focus on  her citizenship.

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