In a city like Anytown, what affect did demographic transition theory have on the city and its residents?Anytown is known as glass city as a result of the manufacturing of glass in the '60s and...

In a city like Anytown, what affect did demographic transition theory have on the city and its residents?

Anytown is known as glass city as a result of the manufacturing of glass in the '60s and '70s. Glass manufacturing was the dominant industry in that city during those years. The town was booming. After the glass industry moved to other areas of the country, the town seemed to suffer by the loss of jobs and revenue.

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Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

According to the demographic transition model, it sounds like Anytown is in the fourth stage of development, the post industrial stage.  The economic boom and prosperity that accompanied the 1960's and 1970's industrialization would have led to population stability through progress and material progress.  The model suggests that as women become more economically independent and assert their own voice, there is less of a compulsion to have children. Anytown might have seen a growth of women entering into the marketplace and greater autonomy asserted on the part of women, offsetting the natural and culturally dictated tendency to bear and raise children. Now that the industrialization of the third stage has been passed, the fourth stage emerges and with it is a stability in the population.  The populace in Coketown has become older, and less generations (as a result of the previous period's economic growth) have been borne.  In the process, the post industrialization has created a rather difficult predicament for Anytown:  An older population that no longer can deny rely on industrialization to generate wealth.