Cite examples illustrating Atticus' thematic advice to Scout about considering things from another person's point of view in To Kill a Mockingbird.  Just having trouble with this particular...

Cite examples illustrating Atticus' thematic advice to Scout about considering things from another person's point of view in To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

Just having trouble with this particular question. Please, nothing after Chapter 4. (Thats as far as I am.) Thanks!

 

 

Asked on by devgru

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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It's a good thing that you mentioned not to use any examples after Chapter 4, because Atticus' wise advice follows Scout throughout the novel. Atticus' words of wisdom were that

"You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view--until you climb into his skin and walk around in it."

His advice was aimed for Scout to better understand the "misfortunes" she suffered on her first day at school. She couldn't figure out why Walter Cunningham didn't stand up for himself (and why he poured syrup over all of his food); Burris Ewell's single appearance on the first day of school each year left her dumbfounded; and she didn't know if she could continue school under the tutelage of the Maycomb newcomer, Miss Caroline. They were all much different than anyone else she knew, but her little talk with Atticus helped her to honor opposing viewpoints. Atticus' advice would also help her to better understand her unseen neighbor, Boo Radley, as well as her new friend, Dill.

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