In A Christmas Carol written by Charles Dickens, why does Scrooge feel "as light as a feather"?I haven't been able to find the answer to this question anywhere, so it would be really great if...

In A Christmas Carol written by Charles Dickens, why does Scrooge feel "as light as a feather"?

I haven't been able to find the answer to this question anywhere, so it would be really great if someone could give me the answer and explain it to me properly. Thanks :)

Asked on by peanut11

1 Answer | Add Yours

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Even though he probably wouldn't have admitted it, Ebenezer Scrooge was an unhappy man even before the visits from the spirits on Christmas Eve. The only love in his heart concerned the money that he could make, but the visits by the Ghost of Marley and the three spirits finally convinced him that his life was worth changing. Each visit caused him greater grief and consternation. Following the visit from the final spirit, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, Scrooge desperately wished to make amends for the sins of his life. When he awoke on Christmas morning and found that "the bedpost was his own" and "the Time before him was his own," Scrooge recognized that he still had another chance to transform himself. His heart was no longer heavy from the fear that things cannot change; instead, he laughed and cried from the joy of the knowledge that his fate was not foresworn: His happiness had made him youthful again--"as light as a feather."

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,957 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question