In ch. 10 of "To Kill A Mockingbird" in what way is Atticus's behaviour typical of him?  Support with earlier incidents.Refer to passage "Jem became vaguely articulate:" 'd...

In ch. 10 of "To Kill A Mockingbird" in what way is Atticus's behaviour typical of him?  Support with earlier incidents.

Refer to passage "Jem became vaguely articulate:" 'd you see him, Scout?'  Jem picked up a rock and threw it jubilantly at the car-house. Running after it, he called back:'Atticus is a gentleman,just like me!'"

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mrs-campbell | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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In this chapter Atticus very efficiently takes care of the rabid dog that is heading down the street.  This is much to his children's surprise, since they didn't know he could shoot.  Miss Maudie confirms that he's the best shot out there.  But, "he's civilized in his heart" and he didn't want people to think he was putting on airs with his talent, so he doesn't shoot.

There are prior examples of Atticus being "civilized" and a "gentleman."  Earlier in the chapter, we learn that Atticus, after giving the kids air rifles, told them that they were to "remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird".  Here we see Atticus and his kindness and mercy towards other people and creatures, being civilized and decent.  In chapter nine, warns Scout to "hold your head high and keep those fists down", telling her not to fight people but to be civilized and decent towards them.  In chapter five, he tells the kids to "stop tormenting" Boo Radley.  He continues to be an advocate for Boo throughout the book, endorsing kindness and civility.  Then, in chapter three he tells Scout that she must go to school and "obey the law", regardless of whether she likes it.  

All throughout the book we get examples of Atticus and his kind heart, gentlemanly manners, and sensitivity to other people's feelings.

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