Choose three scenes from The Book Thief by Mark Zusak, and say how each scene comunicates the author´s ideas and opinions.

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For a sense of continuity, I will choose to discuss three scenes from part four of the book. Part four is an important section because it clearly highlights the main themes of the book: love, courage, identity, and loyalty.

First Scene:

In this scene, the young Hans Hubermann has tracked...

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For a sense of continuity, I will choose to discuss three scenes from part four of the book. Part four is an important section because it clearly highlights the main themes of the book: love, courage, identity, and loyalty.

First Scene:

In this scene, the young Hans Hubermann has tracked down Erik Vandenburg's family. Hans is at Erik's home and is in the process of handing over Erik's prized accordion to his widow. For her part, Erik's widow refuses her husband's accordion. It is a painful reminder of her life with Erik, so she tells Hans to keep the instrument. Before he leaves, Hans plays the beautiful Blue Danube Waltz for the widow and her young son, Max. Then, he leaves his contact information, telling Erik's wife that she can call on him for anything she needs.

This scene is significant because it highlights the themes of love, identity, and courage. It also provides the rationale for Hans's desperate determination to help beleaguered Jews during Hitler's reign of terror. A particularly poignant moment in the scene centers on the meeting between Hans and Max, Erik's son. For his part, Hans had not previously known his friend had a child. Erik's sacrifice means that he will never see Max grow up. Knowing all that Erik and his family has lost, Hans makes it his life's mission to aid Erik's people.

Later, Hans hides Max Vandenburg in his home in defiance of Nazi orders. In this scene, the author seems to be suggesting that identity is a personal choice. Hans courageously rejects Hitler's Aryan goals for Germany and chooses instead to devote his life to helping the persecuted Jews. In the process, Hans retains his humanity and self-respect.

Second Scene:

In this scene, Walter Kugler stops Hans as the latter makes his way to work. Walter tells Hans that he has come from Stuttgart, and he reminds Hans about the promise that he made long ago. This is an interesting scene because the accordion takes center stage again. Prior to this scene, we learn that Hans is tolerated in Molching for two reasons: his Nazi Party membership application is pending, and he is a superior accordion player.

Hans plays well partly because of Erik's past tutelage. Just as in the first scene, the accordion speaks the same messages of peace, love, and comfort to anyone who listens. The author seems to be suggesting that, despite our differences, we want the same things in life: peace, a meaningful existence, and love. In this scene between Walter and Hans, the author also seems to be suggesting that loyalty knows no racial or ethnic boundaries. Just as Hans remains loyal to Erik (and by extension Erik's people), Walter also chooses to retain his loyalty to Max.

Third Scene:

In this scene, Max is giving Liesel her birthday present. As she opens the book and reads, she begins to realize what Max has done. Essentially, Max has removed pages of the Mein Kampf and painted over the remaining words with white paint. On the white-washed pages, Max tells his story of the Standover Man. The story takes all of thirteen pages. In it, he admits that he has feared men who have held power over him all of his life. However, Max's story ends on a hopeful note. He talks about waking up and seeing Liesel standing over him.

This scene is significant because it again emphasizes an important point: we have a choice in who we decide to be. The author seems to be suggesting that personal courage rests in rejecting all that is evil, no matter its source. Like his father before him, Max chooses to reject Hitler's Aryan vision.

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