Chlorine is usually found as a gas. If the temperature is -66, would chlorine still be a gas?

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The answer to your question depends on the unit of temperature used. Temperature can be measured in degrees Celsius, degrees Fahrenheit, or Kelvin.

The freezing point of chlorine is -150.7 degrees Fahrenheit. This is equivalent to 171.65 K or -101.5 degrees Celsius.

The boiling point of chlorine is –29.27 degrees...

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The answer to your question depends on the unit of temperature used. Temperature can be measured in degrees Celsius, degrees Fahrenheit, or Kelvin.

The freezing point of chlorine is -150.7 degrees Fahrenheit. This is equivalent to 171.65 K or -101.5 degrees Celsius.

The boiling point of chlorine is –29.27 degrees Fahrenheit. This is equivalent to 239.11 K or -34.04 degrees Celsius.

The phase of chlorine depends on the substance’s given temperature.

  • In order to remain a gas, the actual temperature of chlorine needs to be at or above the boiling point.
  • If the given temperature of chlorine is between its freezing and boiling point, then the substance will be a liquid.
  • If the given temperature of chlorine is at or below the freezing point, then it will be a solid.

Thus, chlorine will be found in the following states at a temperature of -66 for each unit of temperature.

  • Because -66 degrees Fahrenheit, is between chlorine’s freezing point of -150.7 degrees Fahrenheit and boiling point of –29.27 degrees Fahrenheit, chlorine will be a liquid at -66 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Because -66 K is less than chlorine’s freezing point of 171.65 K, chlorine would be a solid at -66 K.
  • Chlorine will be a liquid at -66 degrees Celsius. This is because -66 degrees Celsius is between chlorine’s freezing point of -101.5 degrees Celsius and boiling point of -34.04 degrees Celsius.

 

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