In a chemical equation, when one of the reactants is a solution and the solvent is water, the subscript describes the state as (aq), aqueous. What would the state be described as if the solution's...

In a chemical equation, when one of the reactants is a solution and the solvent is water, the subscript describes the state as (aq), aqueous. What would the state be described as if the solution's solvent is not water?

For example, in the equation 2C[6]H[6](benzene solution)+15O[2] -> 12CO[2]+6H[2]O, what state would the solution be described as?

[Brackets] indicate subscripts.

Asked on by trevscharf

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enginr | College Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

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Benzene is an organic solvent. Thus, you may use (org) to denote it. In your example, it would look like this:

2C[6]H[6](org) + 15O[2] -> 12CO[2] + 6H[2]O

It is also sometimes useful to use (non-aq) to denote non-aqueous solutions (or phases, in the case of water and organic solvent mixtures). An infinite dilution can be expressed as (aq, `oo` ).

You may find the reference below particularly enlightening. It shows abbreviations accepted by IUPAC, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, used to denote a wide variety of physical states, including the following: solid (s), liquid (l), gas (g), condensed state (cd), fluid state (fl), liquid crystal (lc), solid crystal (cr), and amorphous solid (am).

Reference:

Pure & Appl. Chem., Vol. 54, No. 6, pp. 1239—1250, 1982.

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