Characterize the narrator's state of mind in "The Raven." Support your claim with two pieces of evidence from the text. 

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In Poe's "The Raven," the speaker begins the poem feeling depressed and lonely, mourning the loss of Lenore. In one of the early stanzas, the speaker confesses that he is in his study reading in hopes of distracting himself from his "sorrow for the lost Lenore" (line 10). At this point, the speaker hears a sound and assumes there must be someone knocking at his door. However, it is the raven he hears.

The speaker is at first intrigued by the raven and begins questioning it. However, the raven only ever answers "Nevermore." Some readers might say the speaker is mad and is driven madder over the course of the poem, as seen by his increasingly intense exchanges with the raven. We can definitely see that the speaker becomes obsessed with the raven and thinks it can provide answers to his darkest queries. He asks, for example, whether

" . . . thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 870 words.)

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