Characterization of Scout (Chapters 8-10)?Page numbers or chapter would be useful. Thank you!

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schulzie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

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In the chapters mentioned, Scout shows these traits:

1. Focused to the point of being unaware of events around her: She concentrates on the fire and doesn't notice that Boo Radley has covered her with a blanket.  When Atticus asks her where she got the blanket, she suddenly seems aware of it.  (page 77)

2. Temper: Scout may be a girl, but she fights with her fists.  When Cecil Jacobs tells her ".....Scout Finch's daddy defends niggers.." (pg 74) she clenches her fists and threatens him.  However she says,

"Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more.....and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." (pg 74- chapter 8))

She also loses her temper with Francis during the Christmas holidays. When he calls Atticus a "nigger-lover", Scout says,

" This time I split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth. My left impaired, I sailed in with my right, but not for long. " (pg 84 - chapter 9))

3. Inquisitive: Scout is very fortunate to have Atticus for a father.  He encourages her questions, and she has plenty of them.  When Scout asks him if he defends niggers, Atticus tells her,

"Don't say nigger, Scout.  That's common" ( pg 75 - chapter 9)

He explains to her that he will be defending Tom Robinson, and she asks why he would take on a case like that.  Atticus always answers her questions. 

4. Stubborn: Ever since her conversation with Miss Caroline in school, Scout has been trying to get out of attending school  She says,

" ...my campaign to avoid school had continued on one form or another since my first day's dose of it:  the beginning of last Septiember had brought on sinking spells, dizziness, and mild gastric complaints.  I went so far as to pay a nickel for the privilege of rubbing my head against the head of Miss Rachel's cook's son, who was afflicted with a tremendous ringworm.  It didn't take." (pg 75- chapter 9)

She has also picked up the habit of cussing which she displayed at Christmas.  Atticus says,

"Don't pay any attention to her, Jack.  She's trying you out.  Cal says she's been cussing fluently for a week now. " (pg 79 - chapter 9)

5. Intelligent: Scout is only seven,but Atticus explains things to her in adult terms, even legal terms, and she understands him.  When he tries to tell her about the case he will be defending, he says,

"This time we aren't fighting the Yankees, we're fighting our friends.  But remember this, no matter how bitter things get, they're still our friends and this is still our home."  (pg 76- chapter 9)

6. Loyal: Scout loves Atticus.  She tries to explain to her Uncle Jack why she hit Francis.  She says,

"A nigger-lover.  I ain's very sure what it means, but the way Francis said it --- tell you one thing right now, Uncle Jack, I'll be --- I swear before God if I'll sit there and let him say somethin' about Atticus." (pg 86 - chapter 9)

7. Ashamed:  Scout and Jem are both ashamed of the fact that Atticus is an older father.  When Miss Maudie tells them that Atticus can play checkers and can play the Jew's harp, Scout says,

"This modest accomplishment served to make me even more ashamed of him." (pg 91 - chapter 10)

However, after he kills the mad dog with one shot, she has a new admiration for her father.

The page numbers are from my edition of the book.  The chapters should help you if you have a hard time finding quotes. 

 

Sources:

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