Shakespeare's Sonnets by William Shakespeare

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What are the characteristics of a Shakespearean sonnet?   related to only  when to the sessions of sweet silent thought , that time of year  thou mayst inme behold, my mistress' eyes are nothing...

What are the characteristics of a Shakespearean sonnet?

 

related to only  when to the sessions of sweet silent thought , that time of year  thou mayst inme behold, my mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun , let me not to the marriage of true minds.

 

Quick Answer

A Shakespearean sonnet consists of fourteen lines, which are broken into three quatrains and a final couplet. The rhyme scheme is ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. Each line is composed in iambic pentameter, which is made up of five metrical feet of two syllables each, the first unstressed and the second stressed (as in "That time of year thou mayst in me behold"). Most Shakespearean sonnets place the volta, or rhetorical shift, in the final couplet.


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A Shakespearean or English sonnet has fourteen lines, consisting of three groups of four lines each, followed by a single rhyming couplet. The rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg. Every (or nearly every) line will have ten syllables, divided into five feet of two syllables each. Each "foot" is called an iamb and consists of one unaccented syllable followed by one accented syllable, like this: My mis | tress' eyes | are no | thing like | the sun. Each accented syllable is in bold, and the vertical lines mark the divisions between feet. This meter, consisting of the rhythm of the feet and the number of feet per line, is called iambic pentameter. "Iambic" refers to the rhythm of unaccented and accented syllables (each foot is called an iamb), and pentameter means that there are five feet (penta-) per line.

The three quatrains which make up the first twelve lines of "My mistress' eyes" are actually a list of all the ways in which the speaker's lover fails to measure up to things to which writers often compare their loves: the sun, coral, snow, roses, a goddess, and so forth. However, the volta, or turn, happens in the final two lines: the narrator declares that his lover is actually just as rare and special as any other love who is falsely compared to these things. Other speakers may lie and say that their lovers are like goddesses, but this is simply never the case. This narrator need not lie in order to glorify his lover.

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In terms of structure, a Shakespearean sonnet has 14 lines and is written in iambic pentameter.  This means that is has 3...

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