In To Sir, With Love, please describe the character of Mr. Florian.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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We are given a thorough description of Mr. Florian, the headmaster of Greenslade Secondary School, in Chapter One of this excellent novel, when the author visits the school for the first time and meeets Mr. Florian, and is allowed to wander around to see the school for himself. Note how the author describes this somewhat eccentric character:

Behind a large desk sat a small man whose large head was decorated with a fine crop of carefully groomed curly white hair; the face was either tanned or olive-skinned, lean with high cheekbones and surprisingly smooth, as if the youthfulness which had deserted his hair had found permanent accommodation around the aquiline nose and full sensuous moth; his brown eyes were large, slightly protruding, and seemed filled with a kind of wonder, as if he were on the verge of some new and exciting discovery.

He seems to be described as if he were some kind of eccentric professor figure, with the white hair and youthful face and childish enthusiasm. However, as the novel develops, we see that what impresses Braithwaite above all is Mr. Florian's "deep, enthusiastic concern and undoubted love for the children." He is clearly presented as unorthodox in his approach to teaching and education, but above all what endures is his belief in the children and his sympathy for them, combined with an obvious understanding of the very difficult contexts from which they come from.

crazynitin1998's profile pic

crazynitin1998 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) Salutatorian

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He seems to be described as if he were some kind of eccentric professor figure, with the white hair and youthful face and childish enthusiasm. However, as the novel develops, we see that what impresses Braithwaite above all is Mr. Florian's "deep, enthusiastic concern and undoubted love for the children." He is clearly presented as unorthodox in his approach to teaching and education, but above all what endures is his belief in the children and his sympathy for them, combined with an obvious understanding of the very difficult contexts from which they come from.

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