In Chapters 3-4, what does Wopsle say about "the prodigal"? Why did Dickens include this allusion?How does the narrator feel now about the scene in Chapter 18, pp. 142-143, and why have...

In Chapters 3-4, what does Wopsle say about "the prodigal"? Why did Dickens include this allusion?

How does the narrator feel now about the scene in Chapter 18, pp. 142-143, and why have feelings changed? ( This is about Joe's response to being offered money)

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bmadnick | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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His allusion is to the prodigal son in the Bible. He makes the remark that "'swine were the companion of the prodigal. The gluttony of Swine is put before us, as an example to the young.'" "'What is detestable in a pig is more detestable in a boy.'" Wopsle wants to teach Pip a lesson about being ungrateful to have what he does and to be taken care of by his sister.

I'm not real sure what you are asking about in Chapter 18. Joe refuses the money because he would never stand in Pip's way of bettering himself. It's an insult to Joe to think that anyone would have to pay him to allow Pip his freedom to improve his lot in life. Pip notices that the lawyer seems to think Joe is stupid not to be interested in the money and looks down on him as a sort of ignorant country bumpkin. Pip is too excited at the time to pay much attention to it, however.

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