In chap. 9, where does Squealer say Boxer will be sent? Where is he actually sent? How does Boxer spend his last hours, according to Squealer?

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At this stage, Boxer has fallen very ill and is bleeding from the mouth. His eyes are glazed, and he cannot even move. He is critically weakened by age and poor health. When Squealer is summoned, he informs the animals that Napoleon is making arrangements to have Boxer " treated...

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At this stage, Boxer has fallen very ill and is bleeding from the mouth. His eyes are glazed, and he cannot even move. He is critically weakened by age and poor health. When Squealer is summoned, he informs the animals that Napoleon is making arrangements to have Boxer "treated in the hospital at Willingdon." He mentions that the veterinary surgeon there will provide Boxer with the best medical care possible.

A few days later, a large closed van drawn by two horses arrives to take Boxer away, supposedly to the hospital in Willingdon. The van has lettering on its side, and Benjamin, who can read, shouts to the animals that they are fools to believe that Boxer is being taken to a place of care. He stuns the animals when he reads the wording on the side of the van which states that it belongs to Alfred Simmons, a horse slaughterer and glue boiler in Willingdon. Benjamin shouts that Boxer is to be taken to the knacker's to be slaughtered and turned into glue and bone meal.

The animals are horrified and try warning Boxer, but, alas, he is too weak to escape from the van, and the two horses drawing it are too stupid to understand and, instead, speed up. The van leaves the farm, and Boxer is never seen again.

Three days after, Squealer announces that Boxer has died in hospital in spite of having received the utmost care. He explains that he had been present at Boxer's demise and that it had been "the most affecting sight" he has ever seen. He tells the distraught animals that Boxer had whispered in a very weak voice that his only regret "was to have passed on before the windmill was finished." Squealer further states that Boxer's last words were to encourage the animals forward, that Animal Farm should prosper, and that Napoleon, who is always right, should live long.

At the end of his speech, Squealer makes sure to dispel the rumor about Boxer having been taken to the knacker. He informs the animals that the van had previously been owned by the horse slaughterer and had been bought by the veterinary surgeon who had not yet removed the old wording. The animals are greatly relieved to hear this.

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Squealer says that Boxer is going to be sent to the hospital and that Napoleon is sacrificing great amounts of money to ensure that Boxer gets the best care and medicines.

Boxer is actually sent to the knacker. The knacker is a horse slaughterer who will use Boxer's parts for glue. Thus we can believe that Napoleon was to make good money off of this.

Squealer professes that Boxer's last hours are spent saying that Napoleon is always right, and that we must keep working hard, and he whispered in Squealer's ear that Animal Farm must live on. It was very inspirational according to Squealer.

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Squealer says that Boxer will be sent to a hospital for animals in a place called Willingdon.  But what actually happens is that a van for a horse slaughtering company comes to get him.  The idea is that he is being sold for money.

Squealer says that the van was not really from the slaughter house but was actually from the hospital.  He says that Boxer spent his last hours in comfort, getting every possible sort of "attention" that a horse could get.  Squealer says Boxer was only sad that he didn't live to see the windmill done.  He says that Boxer's last words were praise for Napoleon.

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