Chapter 8 / Volume oneCan anyone explain to me about what kind of language is used to describe the brewery and Satis House? *What impressions does it give, and by what means? *What is the irony of...

Chapter 8 / Volume one

Can anyone explain to me about what kind of language is used to describe the brewery and Satis House?

*What impressions does it give, and by what means?

*What is the irony of its name? ( Satis House )

Expert Answers
mwestwood eNotes educator| Certified Educator

That Dickens has the house named Satis, a Latin word, also indicates that the owners meant for this mansion to be a place of satisfaction and contentment for eternity.  Ironically, however, it is a most melancholic place, frozen in the dark and dimly lighted past over which Miss Havisham perpetually agonizes.

In addition, all who come into the house sense the preternatural quality of Satis House and are affected by its desolation and gloom.  The rats eat at the rotten wedding cake, the young lady is cold and cruel, not like a child should be.  A young gentleman challenges a "laboring boy" to a duel simply on impulse. A boy who is loved and feels the warmth of the forge and its blazing fires, is chilled both by the coldness and tragic setting.

litteacher8 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Since others have answered the first question, I will answer the second.

Although it was once a lovely mansion, Satis house is a place of overgrowth and decay.  Everything is dark and eerie.  For example, there is the wedding feast that has been left untouched for over a decade.  Everything is dusty and dingy.  The house looks abandoned and dead.  The house's inhabitants are no better.  Miss Havisham is not sane, and Estella is very disturbing.

pohnpei397 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The irony of the name of the house is that "Satis" implies "satisfaction" or "satisfied."  To have a house with a name like that, inhabited by a person like Miss Havisham, is highly ironic.  The name of the house implies contentment and satisfaction.  By contrast, Miss Havisham is the least content and satisfied person you could hope to find.  That, to me, is the irony in the name.

mizradane | Student

Thank you. What about the language that Dickens uses to describe the Satis house and the brewery in chapter 8?

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Great Expectations

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