In chapter 8 of The Great Gatsby, why didn't Gatsby's and Daisy's relationship work out when they first met?

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Things didn't work out—as indeed they don't work out when they catch up later—because of differences in social status. Gatsby hails from a humble Midwestern background, whereas Daisy is an authentic blue-blood with a prominent place in the social register. Daisy may often give the impression of not being the...

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Things didn't work out—as indeed they don't work out when they catch up later—because of differences in social status. Gatsby hails from a humble Midwestern background, whereas Daisy is an authentic blue-blood with a prominent place in the social register. Daisy may often give the impression of not being the brightest tool in the shed, but she knows which side her bread is buttered on, so to speak. In other words, she's not about to get hitched to someone way beneath her on the social ladder.

Back in the day, Gatsby was a young man without money or prospects; he had nothing to offer Daisy. But even later on, when the two catch up, Jay can't give Daisy what she wants, for all his phenomenal wealth and equally phenomenal collection of shirts. Society in the Jazz Age may have become slightly more fluid, less rigid and hierarchical, but blood still counts. And so Daisy was not about to wait for Gatsby to come back from the war; he wasn't socially prominent enough.

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Daisy came from a very wealthy background, and she enjoyed all the pleasures and privileges that came with being young and beautiful and rich. At the time they met, however, Gatsby had nothing. He was a young Army officer stationed at the camp near her family mansion, one of many who came to visit and to fantasize about Daisy. At that time in his life, he had not yet built the dream character and the imaginary family history that he created for himself after the war.

Gatsby and Daisy did fall in passionate love, but he had to leave when the Army ordered him to do so, and Daisy didn't have the depth of commitment or strength of desire to wait for his return. When a wealthy suitor named Tom Buchanan appeared on the scene, Daisy aligned herself with the man who was immediately available.

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