In Chapter 7 (Shadows and Tall Trees), when Ralph and Jack decide to go search for the Beast, why does Roger volunteer to go with them?I have been trying to think of a reason for his actions, but...

In Chapter 7 (Shadows and Tall Trees), when Ralph and Jack decide to go search for the Beast, why does Roger volunteer to go with them?

I have been trying to think of a reason for his actions, but it doesn't seem like there is anything to gain for him in Lord of the Flies.

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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This has to be an opinion question that is based on inference because there is no explanation given for Roger deciding to join them.  He doesn't talk during their journey and he only makes a tapping noise.

I can think of a few reasons Roger may have decided to go based on detail in the story, but none are exactly the truth as written in the story because we just don't know why.

ONE POSSIBLE REASON:

Roger saw the growing challenge between Ralph and Jack. Jack has longed to be the leader while it has been Ralph's role. After hitting the pig in the snout, Ralph seems to be (although unknowingly) longing for approval from the older boys who hunt. In fact he is desperate for it. Roger may have hoped to keep the peace.

ANOTHER POSSIBLE REASON:

Roger may have been afraid of staying with the remaining boys. Simon had already headed back, the remaining boys who were minor characters did not display enough courage or fortitude to earn Golding's development of their character so Ralph and Jack may have been the bravest boys out there and if he was going to be in the dark - they were his choice. This might have explained Roger's silence. Silence is often a sign of fear.

A FINAL POSSIBLE REASON:

If there was a beast, Roger had interest in seeing it. Roger's tapping is evidence of boredom, or maybe the need for action. He didn't get to be a leader, hadn't killed a pig, and maybe just wanted to do something.

There would have been no seen gain for Roger at this point to be with the boys except to gain both of their allegiance and friendship.

 

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