In Chapter 44 of Ron Hall and Denver Moore's Same Kind of Different as Me: A Modern-Day Slave an International Art Dealer, and the Unlikely Woman who Bound Them Together, Denver said, "our...

In Chapter 44 of Ron Hall and Denver Moore's Same Kind of Different as Me: A Modern-Day Slave an International Art Dealer, and the Unlikely Woman who Bound Them Together, Denver said, "our limitation is God's opportunity."  I think I have a grasp on what he meant, but what are your thoughts?  

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kipling2448 | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In Ron Hall and Denver Moore’s memoir of their relationship and of Moore’s life as an itinerant ex-convict and homeless person whose upbringing as a desperately poor plantation “slave” in Louisiana who survived an attack by the Ku Klux Klan and who spent ten years in prison for armed robbery, the theme of God and of Moore’s budding spirituality lends this unique story a near-mythical tone.   The two men met when Hall was serving as a volunteer in the homeless shelter where Moore was a regular visitor and who had caught Hall’s wife, Deborah’s, attention.  The relationship that developed among the three, Mr. and Mrs. Hall and Denver Moore, would prove of mutual benefit as the former learned about the realities of homeless and the need for beneficence towards those in their charge and the latter learned about the role of spirituality in rising above one’s circumstances and what it means to love others as one loves oneself.  The Halls and Moore grew so close over time that they became essentially a family unit, with each committed to the other.  It was in this sense that Moore would come to understand the role of God in determining life’s directions.  In Chapter 44 of Same Kind of Different as Me, Deborah Hall dies, leaving Ron a distraught widower.  The Halls had been materially comfortable, in stark contrast to Moore’s life of economic deprivation and victimization courtesy of his African American heritage.  That the Halls should suffer the indignities of death while Deborah endured the effects of the cancer that would take her life was illuminating for Moore, who witnessed the trials to which even the wealthy were subject:

“I knowed what he was going through.  It was just like I was standing there watching that house burn down, and my grandmother was in there. I’d also known if Ms. Debbie died, he was going to have to live through it, just like I’d lived through it with Big Mama, BB, and Uncle James.

“There’s something I learned when I was hopeless: Our limitation is God’s opportunity.  When you get all the way to the end of your rope and there ain't nothin you can do, that's when God takes over.”

Moore’s observation was inspired by the Book of Job in the Old Testament, in which the prosperous Job is forced by Satan to endure a long string of hardships and indignities all of which serve to reaffirm his faith in God, contrary to Satan’s expectation that the loss of his material wealth would deprive Job of his faith in God.  By referencing Job’s experiences and affirmation of faith, Moore was pointing out that, just because an individual can reach the depths of despair does not mean that he or she is forgotten by God; on the contrary, it is in the midst of such times that faith in God becomes even more important.

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