From Chapter 3 in Of Mice and Men, how could I translate Whit's slang to modern forms of speaking? Whit said, “I see what you mean. No, they...

From Chapter 3 in Of Mice and Men, how could I translate Whit's slang to modern forms of speaking? 

Whit said, “I see what you mean. No, they ain’t been nothing yet. Curley’s got yella-jackets in his drawers, but that’s all so far. Ever’ time the guys is around she shows up. She’s lookin’ for Curley, or she thought she lef’ somethin’ layin’ around and she’s lookin’ for it. Seems like she can’t keep away from guys. An’ Curley’s pants is just crawlin’ with ants, but they ain’t nothing come of it yet.”

Expert Answers
jameadows eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In this passage, Whit is responding first to George's question if there has been any trouble since Curley's new wife arrived at the ranch. Whit responds that he understands what George means but there hasn't been any trouble yet.

The rest of the passage can be translated as follows: Curley has bees in his underwear (yellow jackets are actually a form of wasp, and drawers are underwear; this phrase means that Curley is on edge and nervous), but that's all that's happened so far. Every time the guys on the ranch are around, she comes by. She says she's looking for Curley or she forgot something and is looking for it. It seems like she can't keep away from the guys. And Curley acts like he has ants in his pants (again, meaning that he's on edge), but nothing has come of it yet. 

Read the study guide:
Of Mice and Men

Access hundreds of thousands of answers with a free trial.

Start Free Trial
Ask a Question