In chapter three of William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the lines beginning with "'And then,' said Jack" and ending with "'I'll come back and go on with the shelter'" imply that: a. Ralph and...

In chapter three of William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the lines beginning with "'And then,' said Jack" and ending with "'I'll come back and go on with the shelter'" imply that:

a. Ralph and Jack have the same goals

b. Ralph and Jack both fear the night

c. Ralph prefers the beach to the jungle

d. Jack enjoys exploring the island

e. Both boys enjoy eating and swimming

Asked on by Erika015

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The lines you mention, from Lord of the Flies by William Golding, are found in chapter three when Jack has been hunting, as usual, instead of working on the shelters, which Ralph has been doing. Ralph shares his frustrations with Jack, who says the following:

“And then,” said Jack, “when I’ve had a bathe and something to eat, I’ll just trek over to the other side of the mountain and see if I can see any traces. Coming?”

“But the sun’s nearly set!”

“I might have time—-”

They walked along, two continents of experience and feeling, unable to communicate.
“If I could only get a pig!”
“I’ll come back and go on with the shelter.”

It is GOlding's description of the boys which serves to eliminate A, as the two boys are like "two continents" who exist on the same planet but have no way of making a connection. One hunts and one makes shelters, and the two never meet.

There is no particular mention of night (eliminating B) or the beach and jungle connected to Ralph (eliminating C). Only Jack mentions eating and swimming (eliminating E), which leaves D. Jack does, indeed, enjoy exploring the island. Though he has spent all day there, he wants to keep exploring, hoping to kill a pig.

**Just in case option A is a typo and should actually read "Ralph and Jack DO NOT have the same goals," choice A would be the correct answer. 

Sources:

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