Lord of the Flies by William Golding

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In chapter three of William Golding's Lord of the Flies, Jack's description is developed primarily through which of the following: a. Metaphor b. Simile c. Personification d. Metonymy e....

In chapter three of William Golding's Lord of the Flies, Jack's description is developed primarily through which of the following:

a. Metaphor

b. Simile

c. Personification

d. Metonymy

e. Hyperbole

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Lori Steinbach eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Jack Merridew is a character in Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, and by chapter three of the novel it is clear that Jack is obsessed with hunting. The key to your question is the words "primarily developed," and I assume the question refers to the beginning of the chapter, which is dedicated to a description of Jack. 

There is little hyperbole in this passage; while Jack's behavior does seem a bit outrageous and exaggerated, the language is not. Metonymy is not applicable, either, as there are no parts representing the whole. Since Jack is already a person, he cannot be personified (given human qualities or characteristics). That leaves metaphor and simile.

The obvious choice might be B, as there is a simile in the second sentence of the description:

Jack was bent double. He was down like a sprinter, his nose only a few inches from the humid earth.

Unfortunately, this simile only describes his physical stance for a moment rather than a complete description of Jack in these paragraphs. Over the course of the three descriptive paragraphs, the more likely answer is A, metaphor. Golding uses specific details over three paragraphs which compare Jack to a hunting dog on the trail of his prey--in this case, a pig.

He is bent over on the trail, his nose nearly on the ground, sniffing the pig tracks. 

There was only the faintest indication of a trail here; a cracked twig and what might be the impression of one side of a hoof. He lowered his chin and stared at the traces as though he would force them to speak to him. Then dog-like, uncomfortably on all fours yet unheeding his discomfort, he stole...

(The entire section contains 575 words.)

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