To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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In Chapter 3 of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch tells Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view ... until you climb in...

In Chapter 3 of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch tells Scout that "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view ... until you climb in his skin and walk around in it." What are some things Scout begins to realize?


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1. After Atticus gives Scout an important lesson on perspective, Scout takes her father's advice and applies it during several situations. Following their raid on the Radley home, Scout attempts to understand why Jem has been moody and leaves him alone. Scout says,

As Atticus had once advised me to do, I tried to climb into Jem’s skin and walk around in it: if I had gone alone to the Radley Place at two in the morning, my funeral would have been held the next afternoon. So I left Jem alone and tried not to bother him (Lee, 59).

2. During the trial, Scout exercises perspective by analyzing Mayella's life. She does not simply view Mayella as a malevolent, lying person; Scout has sympathy for her and realizes why she befriended Tom Robinson. In chapter 19, Scout says,

As Tom Robinson gave his testimony, it came to me that Mayella Ewell must have been the loneliest person in the world. She was even lonelier than Boo Radley , who had not been out of the house in twenty-five years. When Atticus asked...

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