A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

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In chapter 24 of Book the Second of A Tale of Two Cities, what are the examples of irony? I need this information immediately, please.

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Throughout his novel, "A Tale of Two Cities," Charles Dickens enjoys satirizing the aristocracy whom he refers to as "Monseigneur" [metonymy].  Again, in Chapter 24 of Book the Second, Dickens writes that as the revolution becomes more bloody--"tumultous under a red flag"--

Monseigneur, as a class, had dissociated himself from the phenomenon of his not being appreciated. Like the fabled rustic... Monseigneur, after boldly reading the Lord's Prayer backwards for a great number of years,...Royalty was "suspended," when the last tidings came over.

The words in bold are ironic because they do not mean what is literally stated.  The aristocracy which has exploited the peasants, taxing and starving them, are hardly appreciated; rather they are hated as the enemy and are decapitated-"suspended" from life.  They have trespassed upon the rights of these peasants for centuries, having read backwards the Lord's prayer.

As the aristocracy flees...

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