In chapter 2 of Frankenstein, what becomes the focus of Victor's studies (speaking to the event pushes this interest farther)?

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Of his childhood self and learning, Victor says,

My temper was sometimes violent, and my passions vehement; but by some law in my temperature they were turned not towards childish pursuits but to an eager desire to learn, and not to learn all things indiscriminately. I confess that neither the structure of languages, nor the code of governments, nor the politics of various states possessed attractions for me. It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the metaphysical, or in its highest sense, the physical secrets of the world.

Unlike his best friend, Henry Clerval, who is interested in folklore and romance, heroism and legend, art and performance, Victor is much more interested in science and the secrets of nature. He explains that he was not interested in learning about language or politics or history; rather he was interested in the physical facts of the world and of the human body. Elizabeth's temperament has little in common with Victor's as well; she embodies love and sympathy and beneficence and gentleness. When he reached adolescence, Victor explains, something else happened which compelled him to want to pursue natural philosophy:

When I was thirteen years of age we all went on a party of pleasure to the baths near Thonon; the inclemency of the weather obliged us to remain a day confined to the inn. In this house I chanced to find a volume of the works of Cornelius Agrippa. I opened it with apathy; the theory which he attempts to demonstrate and the wonderful facts which he relates soon changed this feeling into enthusiasm.

Picking up this copy of Agrippa's work has a tremendous effect on Victor, and he believes that Agrippa's theories are real science since neither his father nor anyone else tries to explain to him that they are not (at least, not until years later when he gets to Ingolstadt).

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Victor's interest is first brought up in chapter two of Frankenstein. From the time he was very little, Victor was enthralled with science. He describes himself as always having an interest in science (which denotes he was interested in science at a very young age). Victor's own words tell readers of his love of science:

It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things, or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the metaphysical or, in it highest sense, the physical secrets of the world.

Later in the chapter, Victor recalls a violent thunderstorm which came upon his home when he was around fifteen years of age. It was one bolt of lightening which solidified Victor's interest in science forever (at least in his mind for forever at that point in his life).

When I was about fifteen years old we had retired to our house near Belrive, when we witnessed a most violent and terrible thunderstorm. It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura; and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens.

Victor recalls that he had never seen something destroyed like the tree which the lightening bolt hit. This event alone insured Victor's future obsession with science.

The use of the lightening imagery traverses the novel. Many times, Victor sees the creature in a flash of lightening. At one point, Victor compares the speed of the creature to that of a bolt of lightening.

The constant recurring image of the lightening, which solidified Victor's interest in science, is important because it serves as a reminder to Victor (while unacknowledged) and the reader (in critical analysis) the impact the lightening has the novel's entirety.

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