In chapter 2 leadership of the animals is generally left in the hands (so to speak) of the pigs. Do you think this is a good idea? Why or why not? Feel free to predict what you think might happen...

In chapter 2 leadership of the animals is generally left in the hands (so to speak) of the pigs. Do you think this is a good idea? Why or why not? Feel free to predict what you think might happen and/or use details from the text to support your answer.

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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At the end of chapter two, the pigs are, indeed, in control. For the most part, this seems like a good idea. There is one very important reason for this: they were the most intelligent. They proved this in that they learned how to read. Moreover, they used this learning to write the seven commandments, which did promote order and equality. Here is what the text says about the pigs' determination to learn to read. 

The pigs now revealed that during the past three months they had taught themselves to read and write from an old spelling book which had belonged to Mr. Jones’s children and which had been thrown on the rubbish heap.

Based on this point, who else could lead other than the pigs? 

That said, not all is well. At the end of chapter two, there is an ominous development. The milk, which should have been distributed to the animals, disappeared. No one knows who took it, but the pigs are the main culprits. 

In time, the reader will learn that the pigs do not have the best interests of the animals in heart. So, it is not a good idea that the pigs lead. A better option would be a mixture of animals in leadership.

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