In Chapter 17, the Sealand woman and her helicopter rescue David and his group. How are the Sealand woman and her helicopter portrayed as being good, with a more pleasant, idealistic community as...

In Chapter 17, the Sealand woman and her helicopter rescue David and his group. How are the Sealand woman and her helicopter portrayed as being good, with a more pleasant, idealistic community as opposed to the corrupt, evil, cruel Waknuk society or the askew place of the Fringes?

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sciftw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The Sealand woman doesn't explicitly say that her society is more pleasant or idealistic than the Waknuk's society or the Fringe's society.  She says that it is a natural progression. 

  • She says that the telepaths are a result of a normal evolutionary process.  
  • The process has been going on for years and will continue to go on for ages and ages.  
  • She calls the telepaths a supervariant. In David's eyes that means he is a little bit different. In the Sealand woman's eyes, David and the others are a new emerging species. 
  • As a new species they are superior to the old people, normal humans. 
  • The Waknuks and the Fringes will try to fight and destroy the telepaths in order to remain superior.  That's why the telepaths are either banned, killed, or sterilized.  It keeps the gene pool from being "tainted." 
  • The Sealand woman says that it is inevitable that the telepaths will become superior.  
  • Her general point is that the telepathic society will be way better than the current one.
  • Her reason is because the telepaths will have a hive mind vs. a bunch of individuals.  She says that laws won't be necessary for anything.  Below is the full quote.

' For ours is a superior variant, and we are only just begin-ning. We are able to think-together and understand one an-other as they never could; we are beginning to understand how to assemble and apply the composite team-mind to a problem — and where may that not take us one day? We are not shut away into individual cages from which we can reach out only with inadequate words. Understanding one another, we do not need laws which treat living forms as though they were as indistinguishable as bricks; we could never commit the enormity of imagining that we could mint ourselves into equality and identity, like stamped coins; we do not mechan-istically attempt to hammer ourselves into geometrical patterns of society, or policy; we are not dogmatists teaching God how He should have ordered the world."

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