Guns, Germs, and Steel Questions and Answers
by Jared Diamond

Guns, Germs, and Steel book cover
Start Your Free Trial

In chapter 10 of Guns, Germs, and Steel, what is the main argument Diamond is trying to get across? Do you agree or disagree with this argument?

Expert Answers info

mwestwood, M.A. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

bookM.A. from The University of Alabama


calendarEducator since 2006

write16,150 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

In Chapter 10, Diamond seems to be arguing that because the climate was similar in the area of Eurasia because it was East to West, similar plants would spread and grow more easily than if they were planted in the North and the South of a country. For instance, some plants cannot grow in colder climates, just as some cannot thrive in hotter areas. Therefore, people would have to grow different plants in different places, so the likelihood of a solid crop that would have a great yield would certainly be mitigated. Planting different crops would also be more time-consuming and difficult, thus reducing agricultural yield. That the Eurasian people stayed together rather than in different groups early on was common, so there was not so much individuality in crop growth. Diamond mentions these groups only at this point:

That basic feature of geography thereby contributed heavily to the very different...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 444 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial

mwestwood, M.A. eNotes educator | Certified Educator

bookM.A. from The University of Alabama


calendarEducator since 2006

write16,150 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial


confusedstudent45 | Student

That's an interesting viewpoint. How do they know that it was definitely the spread of food production and not that these places all domesticated plants individually? I'm a little confused.