In chapter 1 of The Great Gatsby, what does Daisy's behavior reveal about her character?

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On the one hand, Daisy seems so convinced of her central importance that she assumes attention will be focused on her. On the other hand, as Nick (her cousin) realizes that she knows of Tom's infidelity, he further sees that her behavior is largely for show and probably manipulative.

Daisy is charming—Nick says so twice—in the way of people who make others feel desired and important. Her energy is contrasted to Jordan's lethargy. Nick describes her as "absurd," "thrilling", "excited" or "exciting," "lovely" but also "sad."

While she is clearly close to Jordan, almost excluding the men, that bond itself may be a display for their benefit. Daisy pokes fun at her husband for his attitude of "Nordic" superiority and his "hulking" behavior, but in calling attention to both she conveys to Nick her dissatisfaction, even fear. Again jokingly, she tells Nick they should go back to the Midwest.

When Tom's mistress calls on the phone, the whole situation comes into focus for Nick, and Daisy soon pulls...

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