In chapter 31 of "To Kill a Mockingbird", how does the writer summarize earlier events to show their significance?Harper Lee summarizes earlier events in chapter 31. How are they...

In chapter 31 of "To Kill a Mockingbird", how does the writer summarize earlier events to show their significance?

Harper Lee summarizes earlier events in chapter 31. How are they significant?

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troutmiller eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In the last 3 pages of the novel, Lee sums up all of the major events that have occurred in the novel, but they are through the eyes of Arthur (Boo) Radley.  The biggest lesson in life that Scout learned from Atticus was that in order to really understand people, she had to walk around in their skin/shoes.  By standing on his porch in the final chapter, Scout is able to apply that lesson.  She sees them playing in the yard through his eyes.  She sees them creating a muddy snowman.  She sees Jem destroying Mrs. Dubose's flowers.  And then she sees what he would have seen when Bob Ewell attacked them on the sidewalk.  This is significant because it shows Scout maturing into a young woman.  She would never see Boo again, but she would never try to get him outside again.  She finally understood.

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To Kill a Mockingbird

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