Please answer the following questions related to chapter 3: Huts on the Beach from Lord of the Flies.  1. Although Ralph criticizes the boys for their lack of cooperation, does he bear some of...

Please answer the following questions related to chapter 3: Huts on the Beach from Lord of the Flies. 

1. Although Ralph criticizes the boys for their lack of cooperation, does he bear some of the responsibility for the failures of the group to achieve its goals? Why or why not?

2. How has Jack's personality developed during his stay on the island? Two quotes to support this answer are required.

3. After Maurice and Roger destroy the littluns' sand castles, Roger stalks the young boy named Henry. When he begins to throw stones, why does he just throw them near him instead of directly at him?

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durbanville | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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1) In Lord of the Flies, Ralph, the boy with "the trumpet-thing," the conch, is the designated leader of the boys, stranded without any "grown-ups." With Piggy's help, he is trying to bring some kind of order to the group and berates the fact that the boys, as far as building shelters is concerned, are "hopeless." Ralph recognizes that Jack holds some authority with the choir, agreeing that Jack should be in charge of the "hunters." He doesn't however, make full use of his own authority which allows Jack to undermine him. 

In chapter three, Jack is quite obsessed with killing a pig for "meat" and Ralph, rather than using his authority to persuade Jack to help build shelters, is frustrated by his own responsibility and is unable to communicate effectively with Jack as they are "two continents of experience," with very different perspectives. Ralph is upset that Jack enjoys what he is doing - hunting - while Ralph must attend to the mundane organization of the group and the fact that "people don't help much." This exacerbates his position as leader and causes him inner conflict as he struggles with his feelings of responsibility and his desire to just be like the other boys; carefree. 

2) Jack has been trying to assert his authority from the beginning and feels he has a right to lead the boys, especially as he is "chapter chorister and head boy."He resents Ralph's attempts to get his co-operation and rescue is not high on his list of priorities -"Rescue? Yes, of course." Jack is coming to terms with his newly discovered feelings as, "He tried to convey the compulsion to track down and kill that was swallowing him up."

He is beginning to appreciate his fascination with the jungle, although he does not yet understand it. He just knows, "That's how you can feel in the forest." The reader is beginning to feel uncomfortable as "the opaque, mad look came into his eyes again." These are important quotes is establishing Jack's character development. 

3) In chapter four, Roger and Maurice knock down some of the littleuns' sandcastles. Maurice is vaguely aware that he has been unkind but Roger has "an unsociable remoteness" which foreshadows the part he will ultimately play. There is "something forbidding" about him and his seeming furtiveness as he watches Henry. Roger throws the stones around, but not at, Henry as he "dare not throw" them directly at him. He is still "conditioned by a civilization that knew nothing of him," and he is beginning to realize that he is no longer bound by that. He is testing the boundaries. 

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