In CH 1-7, how do the readers feel about Boo, and who are his friends? ONLY IN CH 1-7, I would like to know how we as readers feel about Boo Radley, who are his friends, what is his personality...

In CH 1-7, how do the readers feel about Boo, and who are his friends? 

ONLY IN CH 1-7, I would like to know how we as readers feel about Boo Radley, who are his friends, what is his personality and character is like, and the techinques and methods Harper Lee has used in presenting Boo to the reader. Thank you so very much, any sort of help will be very much appreciated. 

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Boo Radley has no friends until he befriends the Finch children.  Lee exposes us to Boo through their eyes, but we also learn quite a bit about him through town gossip.  An example is the story of Boo and the scissors.

Jem received most of his information from Miss Stephanie Crawford, a neighborhood scold, who said she knew the whole thing. (ch 1)

Miss Stephanie is the “neighborhood scold” (ch 1).  She tells stories about Boo’s crazy childhood and falling in with a bad crowd.

Mr. Cunningham exists outside of Boo Radley’s circle.  He lives in the country, and the Radleys live in town near the Finches.  Boo does not have any friends not because he is a bad person, but because he is “misunderstood” (enotes characters, Boo Radley) by most of the town.  This is largely due to his dubious history and the fact that his parents seem to keep him locked in the house.

Boo Radley is actually a kind, gentle person, but not much of that is shown before chapter 8.  In chapter 4, he begins leaving the children gifts.  Scout finds chewing gum in the Radley tree.

I ran home, and on our front porch I examined my loot. The gum looked fresh. I sniffed it and it smelled all right. I licked it and waited for a while. When I did not die I crammed it into my mouth: Wrigley's Double-Mint. (ch 4)

From there, Boo continues leaving gifts until his father plugs the hole.  The gifts include Indian-head pennies.

Jem looked around, reached up, and gingerly pocketed a tiny shiny package. We ran home, and on the front porch we looked at a small box patchworked with bits of tinfoil collected from chewing-gum wrappers. It was the kind of box wedding rings came in, purple velvet with a minute catch. Jem flicked open the tiny catch. Inside were two scrubbed and polished pennies, one on top of the other. Jem examined them. (ch 4)

The care Boo took in constructing the box, and making it look like a valuable gift, shows that he cares.  Finally, there are the carvings, “two small images carved in soap. One was the figure of a boy, the other wore a crude dress” (ch 7).  Scout is horrified by them at first, but Jem realizes they are tributes to the children.

After chapter 8, when Boo puts a blanket on Scout’s shoulder, the children begin to see Boo differently.  They become his friends.  He looks after the Finch children, and slowly becomes their friend by leaving them gifts.  He eventually risks his life and saves theirs by protecting them from Bob Ewell’s murderous attacks.

 

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