As a cell becomes smaller, the surface area to volume ratio becomes larger.  So how is this possible and how is it important to the survival of the cell? Thanks for your help in advance.

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Mathematically, surface area is a squared dimension while volume is cubed.  3 squared is 9, but cubed it's 27.  4 squared is 16, but cubed is 64.  Volume gets much bigger much faster because it's working in three dimensions.  

The whole is thing is a catch 22.  The cell...

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Mathematically, surface area is a squared dimension while volume is cubed.  3 squared is 9, but cubed it's 27.  4 squared is 16, but cubed is 64.  Volume gets much bigger much faster because it's working in three dimensions.  

The whole is thing is a catch 22.  The cell wants lot of surface area in order to move stuff in and out quickly, but wants a small volume to move stuff across itself really quickly.  You can't have both. 

But a smaller cell has a better surface area to volume ratio, which means the difference between the total surface area and the total volume isn't that large.  Good ratio = efficient cell. 

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