Where does the narrator of Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Cask of Amontillado," take Fortunato?

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kipling2448 | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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In Edgar Allan Poe's short story The Cask of Amontillado, the narrator, Montresor, leads his unsuspecting victim, Fortunato, to his home, or "palazzo," and, once there, down a winding staircase into the cellar, or "vaults" of Montresor's home. Within the cellar of Montresor's home are the catacombs where, once in an earlier time, many a corpse had been disposed. It is here, within the damp, moldy confines of the catacombs that Montresor keeps prepared, for this day, a particular small confined space, best described by the narrator himself:

"We passed through a range of low arches, descended, passed on, and descending again, arrived at a deep crypt, in which the foulness of the air caused our flambeaux rather to glow than flame. At the most remote end of the crypt there appeared another less spacious."

It is into this small crypt that Montresor leads Fortunato, and it is within this tiny space where Montresor chains his victim to a wall and then proceeds to construct a stone wall that will completely enclose the unfortunate Fortunato, leaving him forever chained into the darkest recesses of his murderer's home. Montresor has exacted his revenge for the series of insults he believes he has endured at the hands of Fortunato. Montresor exploited the inebriated Fortunato's weakened condition to entice the latter to his home under the guise of a wine-tasting experiment ostensibly intended to verify the identity of the cask of wine Montresor claimed to have purchased. 

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