How are all types of irony used? 

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Edgar Allen Poe uses all three types of irony - situational, verbal, and dramatic - in his short story "The Cask of Amontillado."

Situational irony means that something about the situation is unusual or unexpected. The reader expects the protagonist Montresor to bring Fortunato down to the wine...

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Edgar Allen Poe uses all three types of irony - situational, verbal, and dramatic - in his short story "The Cask of Amontillado."

Situational irony means that something about the situation is unusual or unexpected. The reader expects the protagonist Montresor to bring Fortunato down to the wine cellar to sample his Amontillado, but instead, Montresor begins to bury Fortunato alive.

Verbal irony is when a sentence or phrase means something different than what is actually stated. In this story, when Montresor says to Fortunato "your health is precious," or "I perceive you have an engagement," he does not mean either of these things. He knows Fortunato will accompany him to the vaults, but acts as if he does not want to impose upon Fortunato's time or health, despite the fact that he is planning to let Fortunato die.

Dramatic irony is when the audience knows something that at least one character does not know. The reader, after the first paragraph, knows that Montresor is plotting revenge and hates Fortunato. Montresor says, "He did not perceive that my smile now was at the thought of his immolation." The reader knows that Montresor is plotting the death of Fortunato, but Fortunato has no idea.

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