Carnaby's black cockatoos are an endangered species. How can they be restored?What measures would it take so solve the problem and how would we able to monitor the effectiveness of restoration?

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Carnaby's Black Cockatoos are a large, long-lived cockatoo native to southwestern Australia. The main threat to their rapidly-disappearing population seems to relate to their need for large hollow trees to nest in. In many areas hollow trees have been cut for firewood, or simply because people perceived them as dying and useless. Additionally, the birds need feeding areas such as heath lands nearby so that they can feed their young and teach fledglings how to survive.

Standing hollow trees need to be protected immediately. This could be done by law, or by offering some sort of financial incentive to the landowner. In areas where there are still large trees with nesting cavities, planting patches of food plants nearby would be a good idea, again with some sort of compensation or incentive.

Poaching of these birds is still a problem, so more intensive monitoring and enforcement activities are needed, particularly during the nesting season when the birds are most vulnerable to poaching.

Invasive species are also competing with the cockatoos for nesting sites. Research should be done to see if putting up artificial hollow trees or nest boxes will help alleviate this problem.

Monitoring success will be measured by how many nests successfully fledge young, and by population counts.

There is a link here to the government's actual species recovery plan for this bird.

 

 

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