In Canto 5 of Pope's The Rape of the Lock, how did Belinda subdue the Baron and gain her revenge upon him? What apparently became of the missing lock of hair? and What classical literary device...

In Canto 5 of Pope's The Rape of the Lock, how did Belinda subdue the Baron and gain her revenge upon him?

What apparently became of the missing lock of hair?

and What classical literary device does this imitate?

Essay:

In a two organized paragraph: what is the artistic effect of describing trivial things in such an elevated style?

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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

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As you have asked four actual questions here, and they are found two times on our eNotes website, I will attempt to answer the first two questions in the first answer with the second two in the second answer.

First, "In Canto 5, how did Belinda subdue the Baron and gain her revenge upon him?"  Although hidden within lofty language, the answer here is quite easy.  Let's look at the text:

Just where the Breath of Life his Nostrils drew,
A Charge of Snuff the wily Virgin threw;
The Gnomes direct, to ev'ry Atome just,
The pungent Grains of titillating Dust.
Sudden, with starting Tears each Eye o'erflows,
And the high Dome re-ecchoes to his Nose.

Belinda (and the goddesses) use the Baron's snuff to "subdue" the Baron.  In short, he takes such a sniff of his snuff at the wrong time and begins sneezing (and tearing) uncontrollably.  This is the inciting incident that makes Belinda's stolen lock fly high into the air, never to be grabbed (or raped) again. 

Second, again in Canto Five, there are two ideas about what happened to the lock.  First, many feel as though it is now housed on the moon (as it was seen to rise high into the air).  That is what the term "lunar sphere" means.  Note these lines of text:

Some thought it mounted to the Lunar Sphere,
Since all things lost on Earth, are treasur'd there.

Another idea put forth is that her lock made it further than the moon and is now a star in the night sky.  Note these lines of text:

But trust the Muse---she saw it upward rise,
Tho' mark'd by none but quick Poetic Eyes:
(So Rome's great Founder to the Heav'ns withdrew,
To Proculus alone confess'd in view.)
A sudden Star, it shot thro' liquid Air,
And drew behind a radiant Trail of Hair.

Further, because we are asked to "trust the Muse," my opinion is that the reader is supposed to think this precious lock has become a star with a "trail" behind it, ... possibly as beautiful as the Star of Bethlehem!  What a wonderful satire!

Sources:

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