In Canto 5 of Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock, how did Belinda subdue the Baron and gain her revenge upon him? What apparently became of the missing lock of hair? What classical literary...

In Canto 5 of Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock, how did Belinda subdue the Baron and gain her revenge upon him?

What apparently became of the missing lock of hair?

What classical literary device does this imitate?

What is the artistic effect of describing trivial things in such an elevated style?

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Noelle Thompson | High School Teacher | eNotes Employee

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I have attached my original answer to your first two questions (http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/canto-5-how-did-belinda-subdue-baron-gain-her-473719#answer-671246), and now I will attempt the second two. 

It is not clear from your third question as to whether you refer to the simple lock of hair becoming the moon/star or whether you refer to the poem as a whole.  As a result, I will take the latter idea and expand upon it.  This poem is most definitely a satire written to make fun of two families and their focus upon vanity, but it is also "imitates" the very famous form of the "epic poem." 

As a result of this, The Rape of the Lock has every single one of the epic conventions contained within it.  The donning of armor is Belinda's preparation.  The meeting of the gods is the conference of nymphs and friends.  The games of battle are the card games and such (with suitors).  The banquet is involved as well and is just that:  a banquet.  There is even the entrance into the underworld, battle, and apotheosis.  Of course, Belinda is made immortal at the end with her "raped" lock hanging in the sky as either the moon or the stars.

As for the "artistic effect" that you are asked to relate.  The simple answer is that "describing trivial things in an elevated style" makes them seem more important than they really are which makes the reader focus on their apparent vanity and even silliness.  If you wish to take a more literary approach to this second question, then the "artistic effect" is one of satire, which is the "medium" of this art, that is to say it is the way Pope makes fun of this silly situation of the rich and their connection of chastity with locks of hair.  Note the grandiose language in the last stanza:

When those fair Suns shall sett, as sett they must,
And all those Tresses shall be laid in Dust;
This Lock, the Muse shall consecrate to Fame,
And mid'st the Stars inscribe Belinda's Name!

These words elevate Belinda to the status of the gods and goddesses.  She is now immortal because the "stars inscribe" her name.

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