Canada's independent seat at the Paris Peace Conference came at a very high price. Did this seat make the sacrifice of Canadians during the war worthwhile? Write a paragraph that sets out your reasoned response to this question.

Canada's seat at the Paris Peace Conference came because they had 65,000 war deaths during WWII. It was a high price to pay for the seat they received, and the Canadian government signed as a part of the British Commonwealth. Their movement towards independence as a result of the war was incremental.

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Although still part of the British Empire, Canada received an independent seat at the Paris Peace Conference after the Canadian Prime Minister demanded that they receive one. His argument was that, having lost over 65,000 men in the conflict, Canada deserved to be part of the negotiations that would shape...

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Although still part of the British Empire, Canada received an independent seat at the Paris Peace Conference after the Canadian Prime Minister demanded that they receive one. His argument was that, having lost over 65,000 men in the conflict, Canada deserved to be part of the negotiations that would shape the postwar world. This was an important moment for Canada on the international stage, one that would lead to increased sentiment for Canadian national independence.

Canada's inclusion at the Paris Peace Conference table was opposed by some other nations, who assumed that Canada, Australia, and New Zealand in particular would vote along with Great Britain. The commonwealth countries would give that nation outsized influence in the negotiations. In the end, it is difficult to argue that the cost of the spot at the table—the many tens of thousands of Canadian war dead—was worth the gain in national recognition that Canada gained.

In any case, the British Prime Minister David Lloyd George signed on behalf of the entire British Empire. So Canada nor the other members of the Empire were independently included in the agreement. It was an important milestone toward independent nationhood for Canada, but the sacrifice was immense. Canada's movement toward independence in light of this change was incremental.

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