Can you give specific quotes that show Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, to be a man who lives his life around faith?I need to find a direct quote from the play that shows Friar Lawrence is a...

Can you give specific quotes that show Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, to be a man who lives his life around faith?

I need to find a direct quote from the play that shows Friar Lawrence is a religious man.

Thanks!

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shakespeareguru | Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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The strongest moment of the Friar's display of his vocation and his faith is when he visits the Capulet home in Act IV, scene v, after Juliet's apparent death.  He, of course, has orchestrated her false demise from a potion, so he has probably arrived first to check on the success of the scheme.  But, once there, he must function in the role of the family priest and comfort the grieving parents with the Christian comfort that Juliet is now in "heaven."  He says:

. . .Heaven and yourself [Lord Capulet]

Had part in this fair maid, now heaven hath all,

And all the better it is for the maid.

If Juliet were, in fact, dead, then these would be words one would expect to hear upon the death of a loved one.  She would have gone to be with her Maker, and would be better off in Heaven with God than on earth.  There is dramatic irony here, however, since the audience knows that Friar Lawrence knows that Juliet is not dead at all, merely drugged.

Another reference to his religious position as a Catholic Friar comes in Act II, scene iii, when he believes that Romeo might have spent all night with Rosaline.  He says, "God pardon sin."

Overall, I'd say that Friar Lawrence's role is far more practical than religious in this play, and it isn't always that easy to tell that he lives his life around faith and according to a set of religious principles.  The speech he makes over Juliet's "dead" body is probably the most in keeping with the doctrine of his Christian faith.

For more information on Friar Lawrence and Act IV, scene v, please follow the links below.

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