Can you tell me how to identify the type of rhyme in the Romeo and Juliet quote that says "But come, young waverer, come go with me, In one respect I'll thy assistant be; For this alliance may so...

Can you tell me how to identify the type of rhyme in the Romeo and Juliet quote that says

"But come, young waverer, come go with me,

In one respect I'll thy assistant be;

For this alliance may so happy prove

To turn your households' rancor to pure love."

 

This appears at the end of Act Two, Scene 3.

Expert Answers
mercut1469 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In Romeo and Juliet, as with most of his plays, William Shakespeare uses rhyming couplets. A couplet is simply two consecutive lines which rhyme. Couplets are used throughout the play and are particularly employed when Romeo and Juliet are speaking to each other, including possibly the most famous couplet in the play when Juliet says goodbye to Romeo at the end of the balcony scene:

Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow
That I shall say 'Good night' till it be morrow.
Obviously sorrow and morrow make for an excellent rhyme. Similarly, Friar Laurence uses couplets when he tells Romeo he will perform the marriage between the two young lovers:
But come, young waverer, come, go with me.
In one respect I’ll thy assistant be,
For this alliance may so happy prove
To turn your households’ rancor to pure love.
In the first two lines, me rhymes with be. Unfortunately, in the third and fourth lines, prove and love don't really rhyme but they are certainly close in sound and achieve the effect that Shakespeare was going for. These lines explain the Friar's rationale for marrying Romeo and Juliet. He believes that if the two are married the feud between the Montagues and Capulets will be over and only "pure love" will be left. 
Read the study guide:
Romeo and Juliet

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