Can you see a coherence between the technology progress and human individuals and rights?Can you see a coherence between the technology progress and human individuals and rights?

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timbrady's profile pic

timbrady | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

On the other side of the coin, technology has allowed governments to know more and more about us.  Presently this may not be a great threat, but should our government ever fall into the hands of less benign rulers, then the information would still be there and could be used against us.  In fact, this kind of information gathering has been going on forever (J. Edgar Hoover/Hillary Clinton); technology just makes it much more effective.  We tend to think that what is (our present governmental system) will always be, and this is not the case.

Technology has also made propaganda efforts on the part of government (and others) much more effective.  Through "control" of the mass media and the internet, more slanted information can be made available, and very few of us have the time and/or ability to sort through it.  For example, earlier this year we were innundated with panic messages:  we MUST do something or there will be a ______ CATASTROPHY (you fill in the blank ...  banking, for example).  Based on this information, we willingly sat back and let our government spend billions/trillions of dollars of the future's money (and prehaps our retirement money if inflation ever gets as bad as predicted) without ever really having time to decide if there were an alternate solution.  We were told that everything the previous (Republican) administration did was wrong (do we know that?) and that this HAD to be done NOW.  So, armed only with this threatening information, we allowed people whose experience/knowledge we know nothing about, to take these steps.

I would suggest that you read "1984" or "Brave New World" or "We" if you would like to see the negative side of where technology may be taking us.  (And, of course, it's not the technology that is doing this; much as we hear in the gun control argument, it's not the technology (gun), it's the person "wielding" it.)

Read the books.

krishna-agrawala's profile pic

krishna-agrawala | College Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

The question is not very clear regarding Human/individual/rights part. It looks like you want to discuss the link between technological progress and human rights of individual, and I will focus my answer on this issue.

Progress in technology has promoted the cause of individual's human right in many ways.

First of all progress of technology enabled societies to improve the total prosperity in the society. With this increase in total prosperity there is less need for people to promote their own good at the cost of others. This has reduced the disparity between the 'haves' and 'have nots'.

Technology has reduced the need for jobs that require excessive hard labour and bad working condition. It has also eliminated to a large extent low skilled repetitive jobs that made very limited use of human capacities. This development has led to the need for more and more knowledgeable and skilled people rather than low skilled work. This has also tended to increase the wages of common people.

Technology has also helped to increase the level of knowledge and awareness among people. Such knowledge and understanding has also evoked the desire for a fair and equitable life for themselves and for others. These feelings have been further fanned by better communication.

Technology has increased the value of individual knowledge and capability and skills. This has also reduced the importance of cast, and parentage in selection and employment of people, breaking down the traditional boundaries in societies that formed the basis of discrimination among people.

Urbanization and use of mass public facilities such as travel by railway has been another major equalizer in societies.

Thus we can say that technological progress has promoted the cause of individual's human rights in many way.

 

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