Can you provide me with recommendations about "suggested essay topics for The Sun Also Rises" by Hemingway?  Can you provide me with recommendations about "suggested essay topics for The Sun Also...

Can you provide me with recommendations about "suggested essay topics for The Sun Also Rises" by Hemingway?  

Can you provide me with recommendations about "suggested essay topics for The Sun Also Rises" by Hemingway?

 

Asked on by hjk11

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e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

One issue I find interesting in this novel is the idea of self-denial. In subtle ways, Brett acts on the idea of self-denial. Jake clearly is involved in a complex process of self-denial, with swings in the opposite direction. Loss is what leads each character to abnegate themselves and their real desires, but an essay might explore the ways that self-denial is presented in these characters without a necessary explanation of the causes of this behavior.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Since you are just writing an essay and not a paper, a limited topic is important so that the treatment of the topic can be detailed and not cursory as so often happens when the topic is too broad.  So, writing a character analysis is often a suitable subject for an essay.  Perhaps you may wish to contrast one character's views of life with another's.  For example, you could contrast Robert's romantic view with Jake's. 

There are some questions in the Question and Answer Group that relate to this topic should you choose it.  You may wish to review them to get yourself started.

kplhardison's profile pic

Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

In a novel that explores how to live in a situation never encountered on so vast a scale before, the Great War (World War I), an essay that addresses this thematic concern of The Sun Also Rises would be revealing and interesting. Also, since this was Hemingway's first novel and, some critics say, his most satisfying work, an essay covering Hemingway's novel structuring decisions would be similarly enlightening and interesting.

A suggested topic from a long list of chapter-by-chapter essay topic suggestions offered by eNotes recommends examining Chapter 2 for the theme of Europe as a wasteland peopled by the survivors of the "lost generation," lost because the death toll was so horrendous that it wiped out a disturbing quantity of the fighting generation. Jake is important in Chapter 2 because of his remark that only bullfighters live "their life all the way up." Analysing this statement in relation to and in light of the theme of the wasteland of the "lost generation" will illuminate the deeper meaning of Hemingway's superficially simple novel.

Another recommendation suggests analyzing why Hemingway chose to open the novel with the content of the first chapter. You can analyze the importance of Cohen, who receives a lengthy description, which is a significant indicator from an author known for his sparse and minimalistic writing style. You can also analyze the text of the chapter to look for indicators of the reason for Jake's deep feelings of negativity toward Robert. Such an analysis of the opening of the novel will inform your understanding of Hemingway's choices regarding structure.

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