Can you please give a summary of Proust's Fugitive?

Proust's novel The Fugitive concerns the departure of Albertine, the narrator's mistress, and her subsequent death. Much of the book is devoted to his forensic investigation of Albertine's infidelities when they were together.

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The Fugitive is the sixth volume of Marcel Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu, and is often considered a companion piece to The Captive , which is the fifth volume. Both are shorter than the other five volumes, and both deal mainly with the narrator's relationship with Albertine....

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The Fugitive is the sixth volume of Marcel Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu, and is often considered a companion piece to The Captive, which is the fifth volume. Both are shorter than the other five volumes, and both deal mainly with the narrator's relationship with Albertine. As the titles suggest, The Captive deals with the narrator's attempts to keep Albertine to himself as his mistress, while The Fugitive concerns his attempts to win her back when she has fled from him.

At the beginning of The Fugitive, the narrator, distraught at Albertine's departure, sends his friend, Robert de Saint-Loup, to fetch her back again. Albertine says that she will come only if the narrator asks her for himself. The narrator delays, but eventually begs Albertine to return to him. However, it is too late, as he discovers that she has died in a fall from a horse.

Death does not diminish the narrator's obsession with Albertine, and he spends much of the rest of the novel trying to find out if and when she was unfaithful to him. He is particularly troubled by the idea that she may have been a lesbian and quizzes various women, particularly her friend Andrée, about her habits.

It is as the narrator is beginning to forget about Albertine that he encounters his first love, Gilberte, after many years. Gilberte marries Robert de Saint-Loup, who turns out to be homosexual. Although many of Proust's characters are homosexual, this surprises the narrator, since Saint-Loup, almost alone among his friends, has never shown any trace of this inclination before. As the narrator is disappointed in both love and friendship, he begins to find his vocation as a writer.

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