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Can you live without a mobile phone? I know this question must have been heard many times but I really want to know: "Can you live without a mobile phone?" If yes for how long? Perhaps a week, a month...

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Well I am in my mid forties so lived very happily without a mobile for at least half of my life and would quite happily do so again. Actually I like having one, but if I go out without it I feel happy sometimes that I can just lead my...

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Well I am in my mid forties so lived very happily without a mobile for at least half of my life and would quite happily do so again. Actually I like having one, but if I go out without it I feel happy sometimes that I can just lead my life and no-one will call or pester me in any way. I think they are an intrusion in many ways and I watch people texting and talking on them all the time and I don't really feel they are doing society a great good. So yes I could live without one quite easily.
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I can live without a cell phone. In fact, I rarely use the one I have. The main reason I have one is for traveling, to have in case of an emergency road situation, whether a vehicle breakdown or something else. Other than that, I can wait until I get home to call someone. If they need to get in touch with me, they can leave a message on my home land line. I agree with the sentiment expressed in Post #9, people survived for decades without cell phones and can survive in contemporary society as well, without being slaves to them. They have their place - but it's not attached to our face every waking hour.

Cell Phones in the Classroom

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It would be extremely easy for me to live without a mobile phone. I rarely use the phone and prefer not to be interrupted by phone conversations at all. I realize that I am not the "norm" but it is extremely strange that people seem to be unable or unwilling to not be connected to their cell phones 24/7. Walking down the street, driving, or doing whatever, their phones are always in use. It's funny that before cell phones, people did fine without them.

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I, too, could easily live without my phone, but I really think the point here is not whether we could live without them as much as it is how we use them today.  There is an expectation that all of us are available 24/7, and we buy into that, losing control of our own lives.  The fact that someone can call me, any time, wherever I am, does not mean that I have to pick up the phone.  And I do not.  Some people are offended by that, but I choose to control whom I speak to and when.  If I am out for dinner with a friend, or even eating dinner at home with my family, why in the world would I answer the phone?  There seems to be this new priority, that a phone call or text takes precedence over whatever else we are doing.  That is a loss of control and just plain bad manners. 

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It would be no problem for me. I refuse to allow myself to become addicted to cells and i-Phones as so many people are today. I use my cell only once or twice a day, and it is usually to talk with my wife at work so I won't tie up her work phone. Cell phones are great in emergency situations, but I have never felt the need to let the world know every move I make, so I use it as little as possible.

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I managed to live without a mobile for the first 40 years of my life, so the answer is yes, of course, I can live without it.


We tend to think of our conveniences as being something we cannot do without, but of course we can. We find other ways to communicate with each other and make plans.

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I, personally, would have many difficulties without a mobile phone Yes, I could live without one, but I think as a society we get used to certain things and therefore have higher expectations placed on us. When one has a moblie phone, that person is expected to be easily reached. My family knows that they can send a text or call me if they need something. Without a cell phone, my contact with others would decrease significantly and would probably frustrate the people around me. I also feel more safe with my phone around, especially when I'm traveling long distances. I need to know that if I break down or run out of gas, I can contact someone for help without taking a risking walk along the highway to a gas station.

I also use my phone frequently for GPS. Before this, I would have had to look up or call for directions ahead of time. While this would be possible, it would be unnecessarily inconvenient. 

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I chose to have a mobile phone and to get rid of my landline simply because the mobile could do more things for less money. However I would switch back to a landline and get rid of the mobile if the converse were true. I can live without one or the other equally well, but in my current life I think I do need to have a phone of some sort. I agree with #3 that there are some serious drawbacks not to mobile phones but to the way people use them.

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Yes, I know that I can live without a mobile phone as I have had one only in the last 5 years.  The reason for the change was because we took on the responsibility of caring for elderly cousins who had no one else who would help them.  I do think it would be harder to go back now, but I own a very simple phone without any "apps".  I do think I could live without one for a month as I often forget to take it with me, and so I do function without it.  I believe I would miss the convenience of it, but I also would not miss the constant conversations around me or the interruptions it causes me.  So many people are so rude with phones and the  sight of drivers texting, which is illegal but still done, takes my breath away.  So, the answer for me is yes, I could live without a mobile phone for a time, but I do think many others who need to contact me would find it difficult.

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In idle moments I sometimes consider cancelling my cell phone service. I do not consider this device to be an integral or vital part of my life. Do I use my phone everyday? Yes, I do. Could I get by without using my phone while also not missing out on signficant social interaction? I think the answer to this question is also yes.

I understand the arguments about the importance of cell phones, but these arguments are, at least in part, based on an assumption that the way Person A lives her/his life today is the only way Person A's life can be lived.

There are lots of ways to live: with a car; without a car; with a computer; without a computer. Where we fall in these categories will determine certain facts of our lives but will not necessarily affect the quality of our lives.

This last assumption, I think, is often the biggest hurdle to change. We fear that if one thing falls out of our stock of possessions, our quality of life will fall out with it. This isn't nearly as true as we like to think it is. 

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