can you help me understand the poem "Before you thought of spring" by Emily Dickinson?here is the poem: Before you thought of spring,Except as a surmise,You see, God bless his suddenness,A fellow...

can you help me understand the poem "Before you thought of spring" by Emily Dickinson?

here is the poem:

Before you thought of spring,
Except as a surmise,
You see, God bless his suddenness,
A fellow in the skies
Of independent hues,
A little weather-worn,
Inspiriting habiliments
Of indigo and brown.

With specimens of song,
As if for you to choose,
Discretion in the interval,
With gay delays he goes
To some superior tree
Without a single leaf,
And shouts for joy to nobody
But his seraphic self!

can you help me understand it. what is she saying?

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coachingcorner | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

One of the messages in the poem "Before You Thought Of Spring" by Emily Dickinson is that joy is an emotion that doesn't need an audience - it can be expressed for the sake of delight itself, and for no more reason that doing so is fun and rewarding. In many ways, the author presents a poem that is reminiscent of English poet Thomas Hardy's poem "The Darkling Thrush." In the latter poem, the poet shares how a bird breaks the gloomy depression of a pessimistic winter atmosphere to break into song for joy. In Emily Dickinson's poem, a bird is also suggested ("a fellow in the skies" or hues of "indigo and brown" or "he goes to some superior tree.") The bird "shouts for joy to nobody But his seraphic self" like an angel.

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