Can you help me find some techniques from the passage below? I need help with this!Sir, I will answer any thing. But, I beseech you,     If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,     As...

Can you help me find some techniques from the passage below? I need help with this!

Sir, I will answer any thing. But, I beseech you,
    If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,
    As partly I find it is, that your fair daughter,
    At this odd-even and dull watch o' the night,
    Transported, with no worse nor better guard
    But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier,
    To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor--
    If this be known to you and your allowance,
    We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
    But if you know not this, my manners tell me
    We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe
    That, from the sense of all civility,
    I thus would play and trifle with your reverence:
    Your daughter, if you have not given her leave,
    I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
    Tying her duty, beauty, wit and fortunes
    In an extravagant and wheeling stranger
    Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself:
    If she be in her chamber or your house,
    Let loose on me the justice of the state
    For thus deluding you.

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mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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This is Roderigo talking to Brabantio in Act I.i of Othello.  Loosely translated, Roderigo is saying:

But if you didn’t know about it, then you were wrong to get mad at us. I’d never play pranks on you. If you didn’t allow your daughter to do what she’s doing, then she’s rebelling against you. She’s throwing her life away on some stranger. Go ahead, see for yourself if she’s in her bedroom. If she is, you can sue me for lying to you.

Here are some literary techniques:

Fear of strangers (xenophobia) and racism against black men (Moors): "In an extravagant and wheeling stranger" and  "the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor--"

Sexism against women (they are not to be trusted): "Your daughter, if you have not given her leave, I say again, hath made a gross revolt;"

Contrasting imagery (light v. dark): "fair daughter, At this odd-even and dull watch o' the night,"

Persuasive /argumentative rhetoric: "I will answer any thing" and "I beseech you" and "traight satisfy yourself:" and "Let loose on me the justice of the state For thus deluding you."

Civility / Manners: "my manners tell me" and "If't be your pleasure and most wise consent,"

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