Can you give me quotes from Lord of the Flies that describe the mountain top and the platform? For my project, I have to make a 3D model of the island with passages from the novel that describe the landmarks. I found every one but these two.

A quote that describes the platform begins by calling it "a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest." A second platform quote can be found in chapter five: "This palm trunk lay parallel to the beach, so that when Ralph sat he faced the island." A quote that describes the mountain starts by saying, "They were on the lip of a circular hollow in the side of the mountain."

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In chapters one and five, Golding describes the platform. It is depicted in chapter one as:

a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest and terrace and sand and lagoon to make a raised jetty four feet high. The top of this was covered with a thin layer of soil and coarse grass and shaded with young palm trees. There was not enough soil for them to grow to any height and when they reached perhaps twenty feet they fell and dried, forming a criss-cross pattern of trunks, very convenient to sit on. The palms that still stood made a green roof, covered on the underside with a quivering tangle of reflections from the lagoon.

In chapter five, the platform's uncomfortable aspects are noted. This is symbolically important because the discomforts—the sacrifices—of being part of civilization, which the assemblies on the platform represent, are increasingly less alluring than the indulgent life of atavistic pleasure offered by Jack:

This palm trunk lay parallel to the beach, so that when Ralph sat he faced the island but to the boys was a darkish figure against the shimmer of the lagoon. The two sides of the triangle of which the log was base were less evenly defined. On the right was a log polished by restless seats along the top, but not so large as the chief's and not so comfortable. On the left were four small logs, one of them—the farthest—lamentably springy.

The mountain top is also described in chapter one, when the boys explore the island and get their bearings:

They were on the lip of a circular hollow in the side of the mountain. This was filled with a blue flower, a rock plant of some sort, and the overflow hung down the vent and spilled lavishly among the canopy of the forest. The air was thick with butterflies, lifting, fluttering, settling.

We learn, too, that it has a square top.

The mountain, like the platform, has important symbolic significance. As the description above shows, it is a place of great, almost Edenic beauty, symbolizing its divine aspect. It is the vantage point from which the boys can see most clearly. From this high point, they can take in the lay of the whole island and the water surrounding it: in fact, it is not until they arrive here that they can even be sure they are on an island. It is also the logical place to build a fire to try to attract rescue. Rightly used, it can become a place where a positive spirituality--a bright hope for the future—can merge with the rationality of tending to a rescue fire. Unfortunately, however, spirituality can go awry and mountain top experiences can devolve into experiences of fearful superstition that drive out reason, as happens to the boys.

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The top of the mountain is described in the first chapter during the boys' initial expedition and also when they attempt to build a signal fire on top of it. The top of the mountain is depicted as being square-shaped and relatively barren. Golding writes, "Beyond the hollow was the square top of the mountain and soon they were standing on it" (21). The top of the mountain is the highest point on the island, and the boys discover that the island is boat-shaped and uninhabited as they look out from the top of it. When the boys attempt to create a signal fire, the top of the mountain is once again briefly described. Golding writes, "One by one, as they sensed that the pile was complete, the boys stopped going back for more and stood, with the pink, shattered top of the mountain around them" (30).

The platform is located near the beach and is where the boys regularly hold their assemblies. The platform is described as a square, pink terrace elevated about four feet from the ground. There are also several trees and stumps for the boys to comfortably sit on during the assemblies. In the first chapter, Golding writes,

Here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscape; a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest and terrace and sand and lagoon to make a raised jetty four feet high. The top of this was covered with a thin layer of soil and coarse grass and shaded with young palm trees. There was not enough soil for them to grow to any height and when they reached perhaps twenty feet they fell and dried, forming a criss-cross pattern of trunks, very convenient to sit on. The palms that still stood made a green roof, covered on the underside with a quivering tangle of reflections from the lagoon. (8)

At the beginning of chapter 5, the platform is once again described, before Ralph summons the boys to attend an urgent meeting. Golding goes into further detail regarding the position of certain tree trunks and stumps on the platform. He writes,

The place of assembly in which he stood was roughly a triangle; but irregular and sketchy, like everything they made. First there was the log on which he himself sat; a dead tree that must have been quite exceptionally big for the platform. Perhaps one of those legendary storms of the Pacific had shifted it here. This palm trunk lay parallel to the beach, so that when Ralph sat he faced the island but to the boys was a darkish figure against the shimmer of the lagoon. The two sides of the triangle of which the log was base were less evenly defined. On the right was a log polished by restless seats along the top, but not so large as the chief's and not so comfortable. On the left were four small logs, one of them—the farthest—lamentably springy. (58)

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The platform and the mountain top are both described in the first chapter of the novel. The platform is described first, early in the chapter when Ralph first sees it. I will include here the beginning and the ending of the passage so that you can locate it and then use it in its entirety for your project:

Here the beach was interrupted abruptly by the square motif of the landscape; a great platform of pink granite thrust up uncompromisingly through forest and terrace and sand and lagoon to make a raised jetty four feet high. The top of this was covered with a thin layer of soil and coarse grass and shaded with young palm trees . . . A school of tiny, glittering fish flicked hither and thither.

The top of the mountain is described toward the end of the chapter when the boys finally complete their difficult climb. Here is the descriptive passage in its entirety:

They were on the lip of a circular hollow in the side of the mountain. This was filled with a blue flower, a rock plant of some sort, and the overflow hung down the vent and spilled lavishly among the canopy of the forest. The air was thick with butterflies, lifting, fluttering, settling.

Beyond the hollow was the square top of the mountain and soon they were standing on it.

Following this passage, Golding then describes the island in detail as it appears to the boys as they look down upon it from the mountain top. This description might be helpful to you, also, in your project.

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