Can you describe Daisy and Tom Buchanan's home in The Great Gatsby and give me the text passage?

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troutmiller's profile pic

troutmiller | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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In chapter 1 he describes the outside when he first enters their home. 

"Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red and white Georgian Colonial mansion overlooking the bay.  The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over sun-dials and brick walks and burning gardens...a line of French windows, glowing now with reflected gold..."

Gold is used a lot in this novel--referring to the quality and expense involved. Then once Nick was inside he was able to describe the rooms and of course the repetition of the color white.

"We walked through a high hallway into a bright rosy-colored space...the windows wer ajar and gleaming white against the fresh grass outside that seem to grow a little way into the house... A breeze blew through the room, blew curtains in at one end and out the other like pale flags, twisting them up toward the frosted wedding cake of the ceiling."

The house was very elaborate and Tom made sure to show off how much of the land he owned to Nick, while sweeping his arm in its expanse.  The room with all of its windows seemed to melt right into nature itself, as if it all blended in together.

kmj23's profile pic

kmj23 | (Level 2) Educator

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It is in Chapter One of The Great Gatsby that Nick first visits the home of his cousin, Daisy, and her husband, Tom, in the fashionable East Egg neighborhood. Knowing that Tom and Daisy are financially well-off, Nick expects a grand home but is shocked by the extent of its splendor. The following passage (from this chapter) describes the exterior of the house:

Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red-and-white Georgian Colonial mansion, overlooking the bay. The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over sun-dials and brick walks and burning gardens — finally when it reached the house drifting up the side in bright vines as though from the momentum of its run. The front was broken by a line of French windows, glowing now with reflected gold and wide open to the warm windy afternoon.

When Tom goes inside, the splendor and elegance of the Buchanan Home are further reinforced. It is clean and bright, for instance, and, like the exterior, benefits from the sunlight which pours in through the windows. Here is a description of the inside, also taken from this chapter:

We walked through a high hallway into a bright rosy-colored space, fragilely bound into the house by French windows at either end. The windows were ajar and gleaming white against the fresh grass outside that seemed to grow a little way into the house.

It is, perhaps, ironic that the Buchanan house is so open and bright since its owners, Daisy and Tom, represent the very opposite of these characteristics. Tom is hiding an affair with Myrtle Wilson, for instance, while Daisy is hiding her dissatisfaction with her domestic life and with her life, more generally. It is worth remembering this point when thinking about the Buchanan family home. 

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